UW Struggle: All Clear Edition

Harrison-Ford
You’re all clear kid! Now let’s forget about everything else and go home!

There was a credible bomb threat at the Capitol yesterday; just a few days before there was a credible threat to democracy. Both of them have been declared “all clear.”

The budget, passed yesterday by the state assembly, waits for Governor Walker’s signature. The document contains innumerable horrors, and although I am deeply invested in the entire process, this blog series focuses on the UW element of the puzzle—I just make my small contribution and move along.

When this budget is finally signed, the UW will become the Great Pretendure—any meaningful definition of tenure has been destroyed, thousands of hardworking and brilliant people have been properly vilified, and the state government has seized the property of people who earned it on the state’s requests and conditions. I will write more on pretendure later, but for now…

Ah, the Fourth of July weekend. Honestly, I don’t care for the holiday much, as it contains many bad memories and the maintenance of generation upon generation of terrified, quaking pets. This past Fourth was different, as actual democracy stepped to the front and people fought against and successfully upended significant authoritarian overreach in the Capitol. I was amazed, on edge really, to follow in the press and social media, reporters from different outlets pushing hard against elected officials and forsaking the insipid “both sides do it” narrative for the adversarial stance that produces good journalism. A small sample:

For anyone following the open records story, the state backed off, on a holiday(!), after being so badly exposed and embarrassed. Clearly, upon witnessing this attempted information coup, the press is in super watchdog mode, ready to pounce on other areas of overreach with equal persistence and ferocity. I mean, when you’ve identified specific legislators who wanted to dismantle, among other things, your capacity to do your job, you watch that person like a hawk. You watch with suspicion. You’ve learned your lesson. You do not relax because, as you’ve seen, nothing is ever enough for these people who control nearly everything.

Here are all the tweets yesterday I could find about UW faculty being stripped of all meaningful job protections…in a budget bill…with no public hearings:

 

Beer1

 

I peeked at Christian Schneider’s column to see if, of all people,  he was still mad about people’s rights being trampled—his last two columns are about the UW making people stupid and why we should thank rich people for everything.

I checked for statements from anyone, maybe President Cross—he has a 66 word thank-you note.

Nobody cares. 

Like I said, all clear.

UW Struggle: “Remember the Time” Edition

RememberAh, memories.

Remember back to the days of Pharaoh Murphy and those UW professors that had the audacity to complain about UW Central’s “behind closed doors” governing strategy? Remember how said professors were scolded, and even President Cross himself emerged from a backroom behind a backroom to say that too much public lobbying has hurt the system in the past? Remember how uppity UW Professors were reminded to sit down and be quiet? The boss is the boss after all, opined the great Falbo Baggins, so don’t worry your pretty little heads about it. Why would we possibly want openness? And for good measure, we were subjected to this…again:

Well, like Michael Jackson on Dangerous, I remember the time.

So imagine last night as all hell broke loose in the Joint Finance Committee when Republican legislators moved to gut Wisconsin Open Records laws as they applied to themselves and, well, how they want to keep their work behind closed doors.

And… outrage! Justifiably so. Holy triple-jumping turkeys, even Christian Schneider is on board the “Say what?” train (you know, the Christian Schneider who couldn’t believe UW professors wouldn’t shut up and that tenure was not being changed?). I’m thankful for it—I enjoyed his tweets during the process, which were informative and based on experience, like this one: Continue reading “UW Struggle: “Remember the Time” Edition”

UW Struggle: The Long, Unnecessary Goodbye

leavingIn a previous post about the real people in these real UW jobs,  I wrote about how many of them are leaving not only the UW, but the state of Wisconsin. Deliberate legislative and ideological malpractice is costing us friends, neighbors, colleagues, public servants, and the type of good and hard-working people everyone should support, regardless of political affiliation.

Below is a message sent yesterday by one of my colleagues at UW-Green Bay. This person is one of the most dedicated and respected people on our campus. As rumors have spread that this person might depart because of the toxic political climate, I have seen more than one student weep; others have expressed outrage that a mentor so important to them would be chased away from a university system that was once truly special. They say, “This can’t be real.”

Over the years, this colleague and I have had many students in common; I have seen, up close, the significant effects this colleague has had on their thinking, reading, writing, curiosity, engagement, confidence, expression, and overall personality.  Frankly, there are students who cannot imagine their educations without this person. I understand why. I cannot imagine working in a space with such a glaring, self-inflicted void.

When talking about “star faculty” leaving the UW, there are many misconceptions. Let me slay a few of those quickly and unequivocally:

“Star faculty” and staff do not congregate solely in Madison; they are abundant throughout the system. They are not rare in the UW; they are plentiful. While schools like Madison, and maybe Milwaukee, have more at their disposal to retain such faculty and staff, the other comprehensive and two-year campuses do not. In many ways, campuses outside of Madison are more exposed because depleted resources neutralize viable counter offers. The poachers know this. They are here now and “plentiful,” the description I used above, may soon no longer apply. Amazing faculty and staff will remain, but the losses are deeply felt and negatively affect our mission and duty to our students. Continue reading “UW Struggle: The Long, Unnecessary Goodbye”

UW Struggle: “Hit the Aqueducts, Pal!” Edition

aquaductMusical accompaniment courtesy of Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass:

I’m not one for conspiracy theories, unless they are the two that snuggle close to my heart (Where are they hiding the dinosaurs? and Was Marlon Brando real?), but a curious thing happened over the weekend. The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel published an interview with Robin Vos that included two revealing quotes that were (insert rumble of thunder) later edited out by the deputy managing editor. Now, this editing happened because it’s, well, editing… or, somebody wanted Pluto demoted! Thanks Obama.

Although now deleted, the quotes are burned in my brain and I can paraphrase them with 100% accuracy, and as I said, they are revealing in a way that should give everyone, of any political affiliation, pause (if you care about education, that is). Let’s file the first as an Alanis Morissette “this might be ironic depending on whether or not you get irony” event.

Both comments have to do with regionalization—which the legislature, President Cross, and the Board of Regents are currently collaborating on while saying they are not—but let me start with the most humorous. In short, Speaker Vos wonders why campuses have to offer classes that are offered at other campuses (“access” and “demand” are apparently not applicable answers), and he tried to conjure an example that would sound obscure (think, “the ancient mating habits of ur-donkeys”): the result… do we need someone who teaches “ancient Italian history” at every campus? First, I’m unclear why our republican leadership would not let the market decide such questions: if the demand is there, we should employ ten such people on every campus, no? So I have one essential question for Speaker Vos, who got his start as the owner of RoJo’s popcorn (aside: is the cotton candy image family friendly?): do we really need popcorn at every movie theater? Couldn’t we just have it at one or two and let the rest of the people eat Sno-Caps and black licorice?  What’s with all of the concession duplication? Continue reading “UW Struggle: “Hit the Aqueducts, Pal!” Edition”

UW Struggle: Talking Points Hotline

HotlineSheesh, some of the things people say. Well, as you may have noticed, nothing seems to be going right these days. More importantly, I’ve heard some folks ask “How do I respond to X?”, with X often being the most general of talking points. I find these questions very important, and I’m going to take a stab at a few here, saving the most important for last. And as always, my friends in the media, feel free to take any of these questions and run with them.

Removing tenure from state statute “brings us into line with other states.”

My first response to this is, “Why is being in line with other states important?” What is it about this condition that speaks in any way to the quality of the action?

This is how I respond: “If it is so important for us to be in line with other states, why are we stepping so severely out of line with our other legislation, such as the proposed changes to teacher certification, which would make us the most permissive in the nation? Why is it okay to be completely out of line with states there, but we must get in line in regard to tenure? Another example? Before Wisconsin passed Right to Work legislation, a majority of states did not have such laws (I believe we made it a 25/25 split). Furthermore, our Governor has talked about a constitutional amendment prohibiting gay marriage—the obvious intent here is to not fall in line, to avoid the social momentum of acceptance. As more and more states, and hopefully the Supreme Court, affirm that we are finally “getting in line” on this issue, there will be efforts to undermine that trend.

So back to tenure. Why is our legislature selective about when to bring us into line with other states? What are their criteria for being in or out of line? Instead of running to the fold, why are we not setting a powerful example? Of course, none of these questions have an answer because the original justification is not real—it is an empty talking point. Still, if your Uncle Harvey VandenFreedom throws this out, or you find yourself at a “listening” session, these are certainly the things rolling around in my head.

No one with tenure has ever been fired. Continue reading “UW Struggle: Talking Points Hotline”

UW Struggle: Open Letter to Speaker Robin Vos (with pizza)

sammys
An offer you can’t refuse?

Dear Speaker Vos,

I am writing in regard to your recent comment, “I don’t really support tenure, period.” I understand why someone would say this, yet I would, as a tenured faculty member, love to talk with you about some reasons why you should, especially when taking into account that tenure is much more about the present (i.e. what happens in classrooms and with research today) than it is about the future (i.e. “jobs for life”). You have gone on record as someone who supports good teaching and time in the classroom, and tenure (on the teaching side of things) is much more about pedagogy than it is about entitlement.

I admit that I am nobody. I have no power or influence and can barely get my dog to recognize my authority (I yell, “Scarlet, get away from that poop!” She spares me not even a glance). Yet, I am a faculty member in the UW System, and my wife and I both work at UW-Green Bay. We would love to invite you to Green Bay to have dinner with us at Sammy’s (in my opinion, the best pizza in Wisconsin, with Wild Tomato its only rival). Bring your family; dinner is on us. Here is Sammy’s menu—I highly recommend the root beer in a frosty mug, and for pizza, my general preference is for pepperoni and mushrooms, but I am open minded about many things, especially pizza toppings.

If the journey to Green Bay is too much at this busy time, I’ll be happy to pack my family into our van and head to establishments closer to you. My connections in the southern parts of Wisconsin say that Sheboygan actually has the state’s best pizza—some place called Il Ritrovo. Personally, I find this claim dubious, but as I have yet to experience the pizza in question, I am willing to travel for the mere promise of good pizza. For great pizza, I would run there barefoot with my family on my shoulders (think Aeneas carrying his father out of a burning Troy). Continue reading “UW Struggle: Open Letter to Speaker Robin Vos (with pizza)”

UW Struggle: Upocalypse Final Update, Part Deux: Return of the Wing

ChickenWing
The once and future wing

Before launching into rabid tirades about how UW faculty and staff have to do everything, let me talk about local economies. The other evening, I was challenged by a tenured UW-Green Bay psychology professor to a chicken-wing eating duel. I am from Buffalo, New York, and such contests have run in my blood for generations, back through the veins of my hirsute ancestors (“Rybak” is Ukrainian for “bird limb devourer”). Pictured above is not a chicken wing; it is my family crest. Anyway, the opposing armies gathered at midnight under the cover of jukebox neon and proceeded to engage in battle. A third party was present—someone from “business”—but he was disqualified for ordering boneless wings (he, of course, said they were an “efficiency”). We explained, patiently, that those were not wings, but “nuggets of surrender.”

Long story short, I was vanquished and thus humiliated everyone and everything I stand for. My decline and fall aside, ask the management of Legend Larry’s what the UW does for its local economy. Ask them if they value hungry people with job security. Extend this out to establishments all over the state, especially those that provide trivia services. All I have to say to UW central admin and our state legislature is: why do you hate happy hour?

So, about doing everything…

I have written tirelessly, endlessly, about the fact that Wisconsin’s higher-ed narrative is dominated by a myth: the myth that faculty have power. The myth that faculty are so powerful that they prohibit the university from flex-o-vating nimble 21st century efficiencies. I have waited patiently for Wisconsin media outlets to rely on something other than Politifact to take a stand, or to at least ask basic questions. None of this has happened. So let me point out something to outside observers that should be breathtakingly obvious: powerful people and interests are again moving swiftly to curtail the job security of powerless people. If faculty are so powerful, the great titans of the state, why can’t they simply put an end to this attack? Oh, right, the power is, and was always, held by the other parties involved: the people who cut budgets, give tax breaks, build stadiums for pungent teams, raise tuition, and collaborate with ease to extend Wisconsin’s new tradition of weakening worker protections and earning power. It’s that simple. So, dear media outlets, stop writing about faculty as if they are, or ever were, the source of any problem the UW has. They aren’t. Holy donkey teeth, for the sixth time I will post this list.

Summary: those with power have invested a powerless constituency with the appearance of power (aka “divide”). They then use their real power to attack those people who, all along, were powerless to stop them (aka “conquer”). Get it? They never had the power to cause the problems they are being associated with. (See: American workers. Also, history.)

Another note to the media: feel free to ask President Cross some very basic questions about motive. Seriously, just basic information will suffice. I have never seen someone in the center of a conflict be asked to go on the record so little about his intentions. Whether someone agrees with him or not, everyone in the UW deserves a clear, directly-stated picture of what his goals are, especially if President Cross agrees that the system should weaken tenure to the point of irrelevancy. Certainly we can all agree that we should have this clear statement of vision/direction, no? Continue reading “UW Struggle: Upocalypse Final Update, Part Deux: Return of the Wing”